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18 December 2017

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Can you be both enlightened—in the Buddhist sense—and immoral?

Robert Wright and John Horgan debate. Play entire video

A multicultural manifesto

Philosopher Bryan Van Norden, author of the new book Taking Back Philosophy, argues that a subtle racism is to blame for Western philosophy’s neglect of Eastern thought.

Machine. Ghost optional.

Robert Wright and science journalist John Horgan discuss the range of thought on the mind-body problem, from pure materialism to panpsychism.

Time is money, or vice versa

Mark O’Connell, author of To Be a Machine, discusses Silicon Valley’s inordinate interest in immortality. PlusSelf-made cyborgs.

Does art have to elevate humanity?

Daniel Kaufman questions Hegel on art’s inherent purpose. Plus: What art tells us.

How Luther made Christianity personal

Robert Wright and historian Craig Harline, author of A World Ablaze, discuss how Luther’s chronic remorse fostered the doctrine of salvation through faith. Plus: Protestantism celebrates its 500th anniversary.

More atheists, fewer foxholes

Historian of science Peter Harrison asserts that basic personal security, rather than science, is responsible for religious decline around the world. Plus: The elusive “rational” religion.

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Why Buddhism is True

In a talk at Google, Robert Wright discusses the thesis of his new book on the science and philosophy of meditation and enlightenment.

The Wright Show

Sympathy for the devil

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What happens if you view perpetrators of sexual assault and harassment in a deterministic light? Robert Wright and philosopher Shaun Nichols discuss.

Organized distraction

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Ellen Leanse, author of the new book The Happiness Hack, describes what happens to the brain during a social-media binge session.

The Wright Show

“As you wish!”

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Ethan Nichtern, author of the new book The Dharma of The Princess Bride, explains how the movie’s “optimistic deconstruction” of conventional narratives sets it apart from other ironic films. Plus: “Making friends with desire